By default, Matlab stores all numeric variables as double-precision floating-point values using 64 bits. However you can force Matlab to use less bits by using functions like: .int 160 16 bit integer (whole number .int320 32 bit integer (whole) number single 32 but floating point (real) number A. Demonstrate overflow, numbers that get too big. Write two similar arithmetic expressions where one result just fits in the data type and the other is too large for Matlab to store Do this for the default double-precision floating-point values, then int 160, int320 and single B. Demonstrate underflow, real numbers that get too small and result is zero Write two similar arithmetic expressions where one result is very small but non- zero and the other is too small for Matlab to store. Do this for the default double precision floating-point values, then single0. Use format long to display as many digits as possible C. Demonstrate a rounding error with repeated real number arithmetic statements. D. Demonstrate the non-associative nature of basic arithmetic by adding the same very small numbers to a very large number, but grouping the terms in two different ways showing different results. Show transcribed image text By default, Matlab stores all numeric variables as double-precision floating-point values using 64 bits. However you can force Matlab to use less bits by using functions like: .int 160 16 bit integer (whole number .int320 32 bit integer (whole) number single 32 but floating point (real) number A. Demonstrate overflow, numbers that get too big. Write two similar arithmetic expressions where one result just fits in the data type and the other is too large for Matlab to store Do this for the default double-precision floating-point values, then int 160, int320 and single B. Demonstrate underflow, real numbers that get too small and result is zero Write two similar arithmetic expressions where one result is very small but non- zero and the other is too small for Matlab to store. Do this for the default double precision floating-point values, then single0. Use format long to display as many digits as possible C. Demonstrate a rounding error with repeated real number arithmetic statements. D. Demonstrate the non-associative nature of basic arithmetic by adding the same very small numbers to a very large number, but grouping the terms in two different ways showing different results.