Design a circuit that accepts two 2-bit unsigned inputs and produces a sum, but with a maximum value of 4 (if the unsigned sum were greater (e.g., 3+2), the output would be 4. This is sometimes called a saturation counter. The circuit output needs to be a 4 bit value (a,b,c,d) that could be used to drive an LED display (similar to a 7-segment display) as indicated below: 4 To turn on any of the LEDs use the following mapping You should turn in: 1) 2) 3) 4) Truth tables Karnaugh maps Verilog code for all modules (including a test module) with comments A wave form demonstrating testing of all possible combinations BONUS: using your module definition, create a bigger module that accepts 4 2-bit numbers (say W, X, Y, and Z) and outputs 2 4 bit values to drive 2 LED displays (one for W+X and the other for Y+Z)

Design a circuit that accepts two 2-bit unsigned inputs and produces a sum, but with a maximum value of 4 (if the unsigned sum were greater (e.g., 3+2), the output would be 4. This is sometimes called a saturation counter. The circuit output needs to be a 4 bit value (a,b,c,d) that could be used to drive an LED display (similar to a 7-segment display) as indicated below: 4 To turn on any of the LEDs use the following mapping You should turn in: 1) 2) 3) 4) Truth tables Karnaugh maps Verilog code for all modules (including a test module) with comments A wave form demonstrating testing of all possible combinations BONUS: using your module definition, create a bigger module that accepts 4 2-bit numbers (say W, X, Y, and Z) and outputs 2 4 bit values to drive 2 LED displays (one for W+X and the other for Y+Z) Show transcribed image text