lisa jones 7 posts re:topic 4 dq 2 (obj. 4.1 and 4.2) topic 4 dq 2

  

 Lisa Jones 

7 posts

Re:Topic 4 DQ 2 (Obj. 4.1 and 4.2)

 

Topic 4 DQ 2 (Obj. 4.1 and 4.2)

What factors would cause you to initiate follow-up contacts with one or more group members after group termination? What would be the purpose of such contacts?

Some group members maybe excellent candidates of other groups after group termination, and that can benefit from having the experience of a successful client and or facilitator for other groups (Corey, 2015; Marmarosh, Markin, & Spiegel, 2013). Using recovering individuals in a successful group of recovery can help to share their own story and experiences in how they were able to recover and help to co-facilitate supportive recovering groups, another would be to have networking with them as far as a phone number to call in case of relapse or other, having new found friendship with sobriety and others that are working in recovery. Some individuals may want to continue going to other recovery groups to help support friends that may have attended, or working in ongoing recovery by attending a variety of supportive meetings (Corey, 2015). There are many creative ventures to cause a follow-up procedure, court ordered, having a club at school, wanting to be a sponsor, doing 12-step work, and/or helping to create awareness with sobriety, red ribbon week, and others within the community (Corey, 2015).

Corey, G. (2015). Theory & practice of group counseling (9th ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning. ISBN-13: 9781305088016

Marmarosh, C. L., Markin, R. D., & Spiegel, E. B. (2013). Attachment, loss, and termination in group psychotherapy. In , Attachment in group psychotherapy (pp. 211-226). Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/14186-012

 Lisa Sells 

2 posts

Re:Topic 4 DQ 2 (Obj. 4.1 and 4.2)

What factors would cause you to initiate follow-up contacts with one or more group members after group termination? What would be the purpose of such contacts?

    For members to enjoy long term success, they will need to create a support network that holds them accountable to their new way of living. The group counselor can play a key role in encouraging individuals to create a successful support network. It is important for counselors to offer group members an opportunity to meet for a follow-up session after the group terminates (Corey, 2016). This will give members a chance to discuss their challenges, progress, and setbacks since the group ended. Counselors can use this feedback to make the appropriate referrals for individuals that need continued support in reaching their goals (Corey, 2016).

    The follow-up group can also help a counselor evaluate the effectiveness of techniques used during the group sessions (Corey, 2016). This will help the counselor to make the necessary changes needed for future groups. The counselor can take the members’ feedback and use it to notice trends in group dynamics and modify the group experience to accommodate these trends (Corey, 2016). This is especially important as new generations enter group settings.

Reference

Corey, G. (2016). Theory & practice of group counseling. (9th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

 Drew Silverman 

2 posts

Re:Topic 4 DQ 2 (Obj. 4.1 and 4.2)

What factors would cause you to initiate follow-up contacts with one or more group members after group termination? What would be the purpose of such contacts?

Greetings Professor and Fellow Students,

               Following up on a client is generally used when a client has completed a residential treatment program, and a staff member calls or contacts the client to help with facilitation in transitioning from one program to another (Counseling UK, n.d.).  Another possibility to contact group members is if a referral was made in group by the facilitator, and the facilitator is contacting the client (s), with information that was promised, such as a marriage counselor, an acupuncturist or another type of service (Counseling UK, n.d.).

               In a short-term group, the counselor may present to the clients, during orientation, that follow up may happen as a function of the group, where members meet for one time to assess their progress and follow-through with the topics discussed in the group sessions (Corey 2016). A follow-up group is a place where members can share community support that they have discovered, to discuss the pros and cons of the group series as well as a time for the facilitator to encourage the clients to continue their work towards the group topic (Corey, 2016).

References:

Corey, G. (2016). Theory & practice of group counseling. (9th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning. Retrieved from: gcu.edu

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