WEEK 3 & 4 DISCUSSIONS

PART 3 DISCUSSION

Explore the various data communication technologies you’ve learned about this week:

· What are some things that stood out for you?

· What factors would you advise a company to consider when deciding on the way it connects to the Internet?

SUMMARY OF WHAT WAS COVERED IN THE CHAPTERS FOR THE ABOVE DISCUSSION

We have now reached the end of this lesson. Let’s take a look at what we’ve covered.

We started the lesson by discussing that physical interface standards provide means by which a stream of data can be transmitted, either synchronously or asynchronously, onto a transmission medium. Among the most important items lacking are flow control and error control. Flow control is a technique for assuring that a transmitting entity does not overwhelm a receiving entity with data.

Next we discovered that the most important data link control protocol is HDLC. HDLC is widely used and is the basis for many other important data link control protocols, which use the same or similar formats and the same mechanisms as employed in HDLC.

We then saw that frequency division multiplexing, or FDM, is a familiar and widely used form of multiplexing. A simple example is its use in cable TV systems, which carry multiple video channels on a single cable. FDM is possible when the useful bandwidth of the transmission medium exceeds the required bandwidth of signals to be transmitted. A general case of FDM is shown on the figure on this slide.

We concluded the lesson by talking about. The other major form of multiplexing, which is time division multiplexing, or TDM. TDM is possible when the data rate of the transmission medium exceeds the required data rate of signals to be transmitted.

This completes this lesson.

PART 4 DISCUSSION

Choose a couple of ways how your life would be different without the Internet.

· How would the business world be different?

SUMMARY OF WHAT WAS COVERED IN THE CHAPTERS FOR THE ABOVE DISCUSSION

We have now reached the end of this lesson. Let’s take a look at what we’ve covered.

We started the lesson by discussing that the purpose of the Internet is to interconnect end systems, called hosts; these include PCs, workstations, servers, mainframes, and so on. In essence, the Internet operates as follows: a host may send data to another host anywhere on the Internet. The source host breaks the data to be sent into a sequence of packets, called IP data-grams, or IP packets.

Next we discovered that the Web is a system consisting of an internationally distributed collection of multimedia files supported by clients and servers. Each file is addressed in a consistent manner using its URL. The files from the providers are viewed by the clients using browsers.

We finished the lesson by discussing Internet domains. We saw that data travels the Internet in the form of packets, with each packet including a numeric destination address. These addresses consist of thirty-two-bit binary numbers. The thirty-two bit IP address provides a way of uniquely identifying devices attached to the Internet.

This completes this lesson.

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